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Panoramed Work Package Innovation

New shared value

The Panoramed Work Package of Innovation focuses on identifying new shared value initiatives at the intersection of the research and innovation, economic and social and environmental spheres. These are initiatives in which the innovation (based on the application of knowledge and technology) generates new economic, social and environmental value.

  • An analysis of the gaps and opportunities for new shared value initiatives related to the blue bioeconomy in the Mediterranean Area contributing to systemic change.
  • The identification of potential innovation strategic projects in the Mediterranean Area generating new shared value and tackling societal challenges with a systemic approach.
  • A proposal of terms of reference for selecting and promoting innovation strategic projects tackling societal challenges with a systemic approach. There will be a call for Panoramed partners in 2020.
  • Recommendations for public policies supporting innovation with a systemic approach in the Mediterranean Area (multi-level policy coordination).

The relevant new shared value projects and initiatives are identified through:

  • A questionnaire designed to identify strategic national and international projects related to blue biotechnologies that address societal challenges and have societal impact.
  • A template for experts to collect information related to innovative good practices in the Mediterranean Area (or with a clear potential to be applied to the Mediterranean Area) that generate (or have the potential to generate) new shared value based on the blue bioeconomy, or that have impact on the blue bioeconomy through the sustainability of vital ecosystems or aquatic biomass.  The innovative good practices can be local, regional, national or international.

Template to collect information related to innovative good practices

Achieving the ambitious Sustainable Development Goals requires socio-technical system transformation, which is much more than developing new radical technological solutions. A key question for governments is how to use science and technology policy to respond to societal needs. 

Socio-technical system transformation implicates co-production of social, behavioural and technological change in an interrelated way. System innovation always involves multiple actors, including civil society and users. In this process societal experimentation (outside the R&D laboratories) is a must, since the focus should be on the interrelations of social elements with technological opportunities. Since there is no single best pathway to attaining the SDGs, diverse pathways should be promoted through local experimentation and adaptation. All regions (in the North and in the South) are able to experiment with and contribute to transformative change and there are many gains from mutual deep learning.

Socio-technical system transformation requires new forms of governance and dynamic flexible and open approaches, which include experimentation, learning, reflexivity and reversibility. Experiments should be temporary spaces of stakeholders (governments, academia, business, civil society) working together to tackle common challenges, focusing on the articulation of new shared expectations and visions, the building of new networks and the shaping of new markets which eventually will challenge dominant current practices.


Main reference:

Joan Schot, W.; Edward Steinmueller. "Three frames for innovation policy: R&D systems of innovation and transformative change". Research Policy, 47 (2018).

 

The template's aim is to provide a common framework for experts collecting information related to innovative good practices in the Mediterranean Area (or with a clear potential to be applied to the Mediterranean Area), that generate (or have the potential to generate) new shared value based on the blue bioeconomy, or that have impact on the blue bioeconomy through the sustainability of vital ecosystems or aquatic biomass.  The innovative good practices can be local, regional, national or international.

The blue economy responds to basic needs of society by introducing innovations inspired by nature, generating multiple benefits, including jobs and social capital, offering more with less. By blue bioeconomy we understand any activity associated with the sustainable use of renewable aquatic biological resources to generate new economic and social value. Aquatic biomass (both wild and cultured) from the seas and oceans, rivers and lakes, has, for instance, great potential to ensure future food, feed and nutrition security. It is also a potential source of raw materials for use in value chains of high value, products and processes, such as pharmaceuticals, food ingredients, bioprocessing, chemicals, and novel materials and cosmetics while factoring in environment and climate change risks. In many cases, the utilisation of aquatic bioresources can be more sustainable than terrestrial production methods. Examples of such products include novel foods and food additives, animal feeds, nutraceuticals, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, materials (e.g., clothes and construction materials) and energy.

By innovative good practices we mean the application or use of ideas or methods:

  • which are relatively new
  • whose application has not yet been systematically reviewed and researched
  • where there is some solid evidence of good outcomes from particular experiences
  • which could be transposed to other contexts

We are interested in identifying innovative good practices that could contribute to increasing the environmental, social and economic impact of European projects in the Mediterranean Area. These good practices should be related to:

  • the use of technologies and R&I infrastructures
  • participatory governance and co-management models
  • participation of clusters
  • opportunities for social entrepreneurship
  • opportunities for the Southern Mediterranean

 

All information provided by experts will be included in a database. This information, together with the information from the questionnaire to identify strategic national and international projects and the interviews, will be the basis for:

  • An analysis of the gaps and opportunities for new shared value initiatives related to the blue bioeconomy in the Mediterranean Area.
  • The identification of potential innovation strategic projects in the Mediterranean Area generating new shared value with a systemic approach.
  • A proposal of terms of reference for selecting and promoting innovation strategic projects with a systemic approach. There will be a call for Panoramed partners in 2020.
  • Recommendations for public policies supporting innovation with a systemic approach in the Mediterranean Area.

 

The template has three parts:

Part One is devoted to gathering information about the project and the person answering the questionnaire.

Part Two focuses on the relation of the innovative good practice with the blue bioeconomy and its contribution to the creation of shared new value in the Mediterranean Area.

Part Three is concerned with how specific elements related to the innovative good practice can contribute to the generation of more social, environmental and economic value (that is to say, more collective impact) in the Mediterranean Area. These elements are structured in the following 6 sections:

  • the use of technologies and R&I infrastructures,
  • the establishment of participatory governance and co-management models,
  • the participation of clusters,
  • the generation of opportunities for social entrepreneurship,
  • the generation of opportunities in the South, and
  • migration

 

"Panoramed Work Package Innovation Reports"

Collection of reports analysing gaps and opportunities related to innovation and blue bioeconomy in the Mediterranean



1. Participatory governance of sustainable innovation in the blue bioeconomy. Framing the issue pdf icon [866 kB ]

Héloïse Berkowitz (CNRS, Toulouse School of Management)

June 2019

Instructions to fill out the template

 

  1. The template has three parts. The two first parts must be fill out for all good practices. The third part is structured in six sections. Only the sections which are relevant for the good practice must be fill out.
  2. The template should be fill out by experts, since answering the questions requires in-depth knowledge of the initiatives and of research and innovation policies.
  3. We recommend downloading the template and working on it off-line (on the PDF provided), since it is not possible to save copies online (that is, once you start each part of the template online you must finish and send it during the same Internet session).
  4. Each part and section must be sent once finished. For this reason, is very important that the acronym of the initiative and the email address of the contact person are the same for all parts of the questionnaire sent.
  5. Please provide as much information as possible, in order to enrich the analysis and its results.